Wednesday, July 14, 2021

5 Top Literary Agents for New Authors








 

New Authors Looking for a Literary Agent should check out these agents:

1)      Bill Clegg (The Clegg Agency) Here’s his submission page with all the info you need:

Submissions: http://www.thecleggagency.com/submissions


2)      Juliet Mushens (Caskie Mushens)

Submissions: https://www.mushens-entertainment.com/submissions-guidelines

3)      Lisa Grubka (Fletcher & Company)

Submissions: https://www.fletcherandco.com/resources/

4)      Stephanie Delman (Sanford J. Greenburger Associates)

Submissions: https://www.greenburger.com/agent/stephanie-delman/

5)      Henry Dunow (Dunow, Carlson & Lerner)

Submissions: https://www.dclagency.com/

 

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Makeup for Mature Women - Age Minimizing Lotion


Before      And   After   

We all want to look and feel our best but sometimes we have to make a little effort and other times we have  to make a  lot of effort. 

After being at home for the last year and a half, it's taking  me a little longer to get back into the swing of things, especially with makeup.

That's why I thought I'd share a  few things I'm learning on this journey into my mature years. :D I hope you find some of this info helpful. And, if you watch the video below, please  let  me know what you think and if there's something you'd like me to try just leave a comment. Thanks for spending a  little time with me.  


Saturday, July 10, 2021

Quick Crafting Project You Can Do With Your Kids or Grandkids - Coin Purse

Here's a Super Simple Craft you could do in an hour with your kids and give the little wallets-coin purses as gifts. If  you choose fun fabrics, you could make seasonal wallets that you wouldn't worry about spending a fortune on. 

These little wallets have three pockets. And they are big enough to hold business cards, credit cards, coins and cash. Plus, you could adjust the pattern and  make it bigger if this size isn't perfect for your purse. 


If you'd like to see how simple this is, must click on the video below. And, if you make one/some, let me know what you think. I'd love to hear what  you thought of this super simple pattern.








Thursday, July 8, 2021

IT'S OVER - Now What? 15 TIPS For What You Do When the Writing and Illus...


If you're curious what you should do after attending a writing/illustrating conference, check out my short video below for 15 Tips to help you on your path to publication.


Thursday, June 24, 2021

Thought for Thursday - Word Snobs

 



I was talking with my kids the other day and we were discussing words and how much they matter. 

You can soothe a person's feelings with a kind word spoken at the right moment. Or  you can destroy a relationship by slinging words  like weapons.

Overall, we can use one word to put a different slant on a perspective, much like colors you might use in art, words paint pictures. 

I was saying to my husband this morning that the "intricacies" of....

and he said, "why don't you just say the "details" of  ...

I tried to explain by saying "details" is a blunt word that doesn't describe the little nuances of what I was trying to explain.

He said, "Nuances...now you really sound like a word snob."

It's important to know my husband speaks multiple languages, while I only speak one. So maybe that's the reason I use more descriptive words when I'm speaking English. Plus, I want to paint my pictures with words...not to say I wouldn't want to paint a picture with colors if I was talented enough to do it effectively. 

Anyway, what do you think? Is it being a  word snob to use a more descriptive word or is it something else entirely?

I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.





Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Writerly Wednesday - 5 top Literary Agents Looking for Writers and Illustrators


HERE ARE 5 OF THE TOP LITERARY AGENTS FOR 2020-2021
 
These are some of the top literary agents in the industry. Not all are accepting submissions at the moment, however, it is always a good idea to familiarize yourself with the names, agencies and requirements of submission so that in the future you are prepared to submit to them.

1)    Holly McGhee (Pippin Properties):

Holly requires an exclusive submission – check out her details here:

https://www.pippinproperties.com/submissions

Query to: ExclusivetoHolly@pippinproperties.com

2)    Stephen Barbara (Inkwell Management)

 https://inkwellmanagement.com/

Stephen is always drawn to compelling stories that marry quality writing to bold, imaginative concepts.

Put the name of the agent you are submitting to in the subject line of your query

No attachments: In the email, include a query letter and a short writing sample (1-2 chapters).

Illustrator include a query letter and a link to your portfolio. Please note that InkWell only accepts queries for books.

 Query to: submissions [at] inkwellmanagement [dot] com

 3)    Rosemary Stimola (Stimola Literary Studio)

https://www.stimolaliterarystudio.com/the-agency

DO NOT QUERY THIS AGENT AT THIS TIME: Rosemary is not currently accepting unsolicited submissions.

 4)    Emily van Beek (Folio Literary Management)

https://www.foliojr.com/emily-van-beek/

Accepts: YA, middle grade, and picture books must be author/illustrator

Send Query to: email to Emily @ foliolitmanagement . com

In the body of the email send query and 10 pages

5)    Laura Rennert (Andrea Brown Literary Agency)

https://www.andreabrownlit.com/Team/Laura-Rennert

 Laura takes a wide variety of literature. She accepts picture books to young adult. On the adult side, literary-commercial fiction, thrillers, horror, sci-fi/fantasy, speculative fiction, and some historical fiction. She loves literary voice and commercial conception.

 Query via form: https://querymanager.com/query/LauraRennert


Monday, June 21, 2021

Flosstube Episode #8 - My 3-Spiders Design and other Fall Patterns

Things are starting to get back to normal - Let's all HANG IN THERE!



If you'd like to join me and my sis on our crafting journey, just click on the video below.


Thursday, June 17, 2021

Makeup Tutorial for Mature Women


I'll be 60 in September and have worked to stay healthy and look my best throughout my life. I thought I'd show you how I work to stay healthy and use makeup and common household items to look my best, as inexpensively as I can.

Friday, June 11, 2021

RED, WHITE and BLUE Striped Cake to Celebrate!



I wanted to make a practice cake for my July 4th celebration. So, this is what I made. If you're curious about a yummy vanilla buttercream frosting, check out my recipe listed in the YouTube description box. It is simple, yummy and cheap to make. 

If you make one, please let  me know. I'd love to see it. 

Monday, June 7, 2021

How to Make Homemade Dandelion Tea


Have you ever wondered what Dandelion Tea tastes like? Well, I wanted to find out. So, I made some. It was  easy to do. All I had to do was go out in the yard and gather some dandelions for my tea. 

If you're curious how I made the tea, just watch the clip below.



Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Voice for Writers


When writers submit a query with an example of their work, they wait and sometimes wait and wait to hear back. And, like Tom  Petty said, The Waiting is the Hardest  Part.  

But then when that long-anticipated email arrives, excitement floods the writer's heart.

Sometimes, it is a quick let down with the only bit of feedback saying, "The sample didn't speak to me." Or, sometimes the feedback might be, "The voice didn't resonate with me."

"The Voice" might seem like an easy thing to capture but it's not always so easy.

Voice is a  difficult thing to define but literary agent Rachel Gardner said, "Your writer's voice is the expression of YOU on the page."

But even hearing this definition, voice is still an "unseen" characteristic of your writing. I think of it as an element that makes the characters come alive. 

This is a clip I put together years ago with my family to help "show not tell" what Voice is. 

Each person will show an example of Voice, that illusive element all writers strive to achieve. 

I hope you enjoy it.


 If you can't view it, copy and  paste this url into your browser: https://youtu.be/_4h_PnIFLzg 

StitchFix Unboxing

If you hate shopping for clothes, like me, check out this video. And, if you get a StitchFix, let me  know. I'd love to hear your input.

Wednesday, May 19, 2021

3 Literary Agents Looking for Clients - Writerly Wednesday

 




1) Jessica Faust of Bookends Literary: https://bookendsliterary.com/submissions/

Accepting: fiction, women's fiction, mystery, thrillers, suspense and domestic suspense. She enjoys dark stories and loves a Midwestern perspective.

Also accepting: some nonfiction: including current affairs, personal development, self-help, mind, body, and spirit, and business.

She’d also like to represent more business books by women and business leaders of color.

To submit: to Jessica Faust go to her submissions page and submit to her Query Manager form https://querymanager.com/query/jessica_faust

2) Bernadette Baker Baughman of Victoria Sanders Literary: 

https://www.victoriasanders.com/about-us

Accepting: thrillers, contemporary novels, magical realism, young adult, and books for kids.

Also accepting: pop-culture, gift books, and memoir.

To submit: Send a query letter with the first three chapters (or about 25 pages) pasted into the body of the message to queriesvsa @gmail .com 

3) Andrea Somberg of Harvey Klinger Literary: 

https://www.harveyklinger.com/about/harvey/#andrea

Accepting: fiction and nonfiction, including projects for adult, young adult and middle grade audiences.

To submit: Send your query to: andrea @ harveyklinger . com





Wednesday, May 12, 2021

3 Publishers Accepting Un-agented Author's Picture Book Manuscripts - WRITERLY WEDNESDAY

 


Picture Book Writers, if you're looking for Publishers who will accept manuscripts from unrepresented authors, you might want to take some notes because here are three  publishers accepting unagented picture book manuscripts:

1) 

Albert Whitman & Co accepts submissions from authors without agents:

They are looking for fiction and nonfiction picture books for kids 1 to 8 years old. 

The Word count should not exceed 1000 words. 

Send a cover letter (inside the email) including the following information:

  • A brief description of the story;
  • Your bio (including any relevant publications and/or pertinent information regarding your expertise related to your story)
  • List comparative book titles that have been recently published (during the past five years.) Include similarities and how your manuscript is different.
  • You do not need to include illustrations but, if you are an illustrator, include pdfs or jpegs not to exceed 4 MB

Send letter and  attachments to:

2) 

Charlesbridge Children's Book Submissions: Charlesbridge Children's Book Submissions

Charlesbridge publishes fiction and nonfiction picture books.

They tend to focus on nature, science, math, social studies, biography, history, and the arts.

They accept only digital submissions for all manuscripts, including author/illustrator book dummies.

Send the complete picture book manuscript.

Via Email to:

childrens.submissions@charlesbridge.com

3) 

Flashlight Press

Seeks fictional children’s picture books for children 4-8 years old.

Word Count: Under 1000 words with a universal theme that deals with family or social situations

Email: submissions@flashlightpress.com

Include in the Subject Line Include: QUERY for the Title of Your Manuscript.

Attach your manuscript as a .doc, .docx, or PDF and copy the following text into the body of the email with your responses to the blanks included:

Title of Story: _____________

Word Count: _________

Target Age: ________

Subject or Theme of story (1-5 words): _____________

Summary (3 sentences or less):___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Your Name: _____________________________________

Occupation: ________________________________________________

City, State, Country: _________________________________________

If you have been published previously, list titles, publishers, and pub dates: _____________________

Anything else you’d like to tell us: _______________________________________________

Submission Guidelines - Flashlight Press

 

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Author Interview of Heather Ransom Science Teacher who Can Almost See th...


 It's Wednesday, May 5, 2021, and it's Cinco De Mayo. I hope you're all having a great sunny day - like we are in Portland, Oregon.

And for my writer friends, I've got an interview from a writer who is also a business owner, a science teacher and has had an eco-mystery published as a trilogy. So, if you're interested in science this might be right up your alley, or perhaps you're interested in writing a trilogy and getting it published, Heather might be the person you'd like to hear from.

So check out my interview of her below.


Sunday, May 2, 2021

Flosstube Episode 7 - A Short Update of Progress, Plans and the Blackbir...


My sister and I have been trying to do things  we used  to love to do when we were young. One  of those things is cross-stitching. Sew ;D we're working on projects we can do together - even if we're apart. And one of those projects is a Halloween decoration. And, if you've seen any of my blogs around the Fall, you know I love to decorate my yard for the kids. And this cross-stitch project might give you a clue about this  year's plans for decorating my yard. 

I'm also taking part in a cross-stitch SAL (which is a Stitch Along) and I'm hoping the SAL will help me make some progress on my Blackbird Design-Spell of the Moon (which just happens to be another Fall Themed pattern). 

Plus, there's a little bit about a fiber art stop at Jorsted Creek in Olympia. 



Take a peek below at the short clip, if you're interested in crafting, stitching, knitting and more. 

Plus, Happy May!

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Word Count for Writers: Picture Books, Middle Grade, Young Adult and More

 


Word Count/Page Count and More

If you're a writer just starting out, you might have a lot of questions. Some might involve craft, how to create a story, how to develop a character or just how to even begin the process. I'll try to cover those issues over the next few months but I wanted to start with some basic information today about "required" Word Count/Page Length in books.

"Required" is a loaded word because some people say the word count is whatever it takes to tell the story. That might be true in a creative sense but, if you eventually want to get your book published, you'll want to follow some general guidelines that will make your book more attractive to agents, editors and publishers. 

I have looked at publishing links, agent blogs and expert recommendations to gather some basic guidelines to follow. Here’s what I’ve found:

WORD COUNT:

Board Books should be no more than 100 words

Early Picture Books should be a maximum of 400 words

Picture Books should be up to 600 words

Nonfiction Picture Books can be longer at 3,000 words max, but try to keep it closer to 1,000 to 2,000 words

Early Readers are 1,500 words is the max

Chapter Books vary widely based on the audience but usually they start at 4,000 words and max out at 15,000 words

(Additional information according to Scholastic)

Middle Grade Books are for kids in 3rd-6th grade with age ranges of 6-11 years.

Word Count Length: 30-50K words

Young Adult Books: are for kids in 7-12th grade with age ranges of 12-18 years.   

Word Count Length: 50-75K words

PAGE COUNT:

Chapter Books are typically 35-65 pages 

Low-Middle Grade Books are 45-90 pages

General Middle Grade Books are 90-120 pages

Young Adult Books are 150-200 pages

And, if you’re curious about chapter length, check out Mary Kole’s 2017 blog post: Children'sBook Manuscript Chapter Length | Kidlit

Helpful links:

FrequentlyAsked Questions about Children's Writing (writing-world.com)

According to Writing World  FrequentlyAsked Questions about Children's Writing (writing-world.com)

According to Mary Kole at ManuscriptLength: How Long Should a Children's Book Be? | Kidlit:

(According to Writing World: www.writing-world.com/children/FAQ.shtml)


Sunday, April 25, 2021

Flosstube Episode 6 - If the Hat Fits




Halloween is just around the corner...at least  when it comes to cross-stitching.

We're sisters who are trying to relearn some of the things we thought were fun...when we were young...er.

It's been a long time since we were crafting together but it sure is fun to spend time relaxing (almost) sometimes  we have to frog things and this was one of those  time. But, it's always fun to do something we love together.

I hope you'll join us on our creative journey. And, if you do, please share your journey in the comments below. 


Friday, April 23, 2021

Beginning artist Pencil and charcoal sketch




During the pandemic, I had to find ways to spend my extra time. So, I took up art. Something I have always enjoyed but never have taken any classes to be able to do. Anyway, I know I'm not very good but I'm learning a lot this year and I'm enjoying the quiet peaceful time I spend sketching and/or painting. 

If you are a beginning artist too, please comment below, so I can check out your stuff. We newbies need to band together and encourage each other to keep on going when we aren't happy with what we've done...yet. :D

Anyway, I've included a short video which shows my process. I hope you enjoy it. And I hope you all have an artful life.


Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Writerly Wednesday - Don't Feel Rejected - or at least you're in GREAT company

 

A Short History of Rejections for When You’re Feeling Rejected

1) Chicken Soup for the Soul was rejected 144 times before it was picked up and became a runaway best-selling book.

2) Madeleine L’ Engle’s novel, A Wrinkle In Time was rejected 29 times.

3) Lisa Genova’s novel, Still Alice, was rejected more than 100 times, and she went to self-publish, carrying books in the trunk of her car. Her book then went on to be a best-seller and a popular movie starring Julianne Moore, who was nominated for an Academy Award for her portrayal of Alice.

4) The Tale of Peter Rabbit was turned down so many times, Beatrix Potter eventually self-published the beloved story.

5) Ursula LeGuin’s novel The Left Hand of Darkness was rejected as being “endlessly complicated…hopelessly bogged down…and unreadable.” 

6) Kathryn Stockett’s novel, The Help was rejected from 60 agents before it was picked and turned into a best-selling novel and film.

7) One of Louisa May Alcott’s rejections of Little Women, included this quip: “Stick to teaching.”

8) In response to Moby Dick, Peter J. Bentley, of Bentley & Son Publishing, asked Herman Melville, “Does it have to be a whale?” 

9) Alex Haley’s Roots was rejected 200 consecutive times.

10) Shel Silverstein had a difficult time publishing The Giving Tree, which he was told would never sell.

11) The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was rejected so many times that author L. Frank Baum started keeping track in a journal he called A Record of Failures.

12) Harry Potter was famously rejected by nearly a dozen publishers before one agent’s 8 year-old daughter devoured the book and demanded more. Only then was it picked up. What if that 8 year-old had been napping??

13) The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame, was described as “An irresponsible holiday story that will never sell.” And then, it sold 25 million copies worldwide.

14) Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, by Robert M. Pirsig, is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for having the most number of rejections for a best selling book (121 rejections).

15) Meg Cabot, who wrote The Princess Diaries, collected so many rejection letters, she kept them in a bag under her bed that eventually grew enough she could not lift it. Her book eventually sold 15 million copies. 

16) Jason Wallace’s Out of Shadows is rejected 100 times by literary agents and publishers, before it is taken on and wins the Costa Book Award in 2008.

17) James Patterson’s novel, The Thomas Berryman Number, was rejected by 31 publishers in a row, then went on to become a best-selling novel. Patterson went on to write 19 books in a row that landed on the best sellers list.

18) Kate DiCamillo racked up a staggering 473 rejection letters in six years before she published her first novel, Because of Winn-Dixie.

(Thanks to Darlene Pagan for this inspiring list)

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Writerly Wednesday - Interview of Author Stormi Lewis




Author Stormi Lewis shares tips, tricks and hints on how to get published in this short half-hour interview. Join us for a trip down the path to publication. Stormi has two books out and a third one on the way. I'm sure you'll enjoy her warm personality and value her writing wisdom. 

Plus, post a comment below for a chance to win an autographed copy of her latest book:



And don't forget to click on the link below to view the interview, and visit my YouTube channel to see more author interviews. 

Thursday, April 8, 2021

DIY Father/Son Woodworking Project - Murphy bed



It looks deceptively like a cabinet, at least that's what I think. In truth, it's a bed hidden inside a vertical frame. This is a Murphy Bed. 

My husband and son wanted to build one. And, for whatever reason, I didn't realize what a big project it would be. Now, that's saying something because we've taken on a few ambitious remodeling jobs in our days. Anyway, I thought it would be a couple of hours and 

voila we'd have a new bedroom thanks for the wall hanging bed. But it wasn't quite as easy as I thought it would be.


If you're curious, watch the video below or visit my YouTube channel. But here are a few of the photos from the project, including the handles on the door, which my son created from some  of the leftover wood they used to make the bed. 


Here is the bed frame being made




And here is the entire movie of the process. I hope you find this interesting because I sure did. 


Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Writerly Wednesday - 5 Literary Agents Looking for Clients


If you're looking to submit your work to literary agents, you should always check out their website to see new updates, tips and hints about how they'd like you to submit your work to them. But, if you're looking for ideas of where to submit your work, here are five who are looking for new clients that you can research a little more on your own. And good luck to you. 

1)      JamesMcGowan from BookendsLiterary says, “I'm very eager to find: ADULT mystery, crime, domestic suspense and horror/speculative fiction.” Query James at: link

2)     Adria Goetz at Martin Literary says,

“I represent, in general: Picture books, Middle Grade, Young Adult, Adult Fiction (as of 2020!), Graphic Novels, Quirky gift books, Devotionals for the Christian market, Books for both the general market, and the Christian market. “  Query Adria at this Link  

    3)    Amy Bishop at Dystel Goderich says she’s looking for more “Upmarket bookclub fiction” Query her at this link

 4)  Heather Carr at the Friedrich Agency is looking for narrative nonfiction and literary fiction, especially “voice-driven nonfiction” that teaches  her something new.  Query Heather at this link

5   5) Kat Kerr at the Donald Mass Literary Agency is looking for Romantic Comedies  with diverse characters.  Query Kat at this link


Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Writerly Wednesday - 5 Helpful Sites for Writers to Use on their Journey down the Path to Publication


 I thought I would provide my writer friends with a list of helpful websites that I have used in the past and found them to be valuable resources. I used these links to help me organize queries, find agents to submit  writing to, and some even helped me connect with other writers in the writing community.

My helpful links are: 

1)    Search for Literary Agents | QueryTracker

2)    Publishers Marketplace: Browse Member Pages

3)    AgentQuery :: Find the Agent Who Will Find You a Publisher

4)    The Official Manuscript Wish List & #MSWL ® Website

5)   WRITER BEWARE® - SFWA

I wish you all well on your journey down the path to publication.  

Please let  me know if you find these links helpful, as I would really like to find valuable resources for others to use to help them meet their goals and writing needs. 

Monday, March 29, 2021

Easter Bunny Cake 2021 versus Easter Bunny Cake 2020



 I made this Easter Bunny cake to celebrate the holiday with friends and family. I made the bunny out of fondant and painted the face with food coloring.

Fondant being Rolled Out

This is what the fondant looked like as I started rolling it out.

Then I started building the face.

Making the Fondant Bunny

 You can watch the video here: to see how I did  it.


But last year I made another Easter Bunny cake


I made this bunny the same way...sort of. He is covered in fondant too but his face was created not painted on with edible food coloring.

You can see the process through these photos I took as I made him last year. 





So, which cake do you like better- the 2020 version or the 2021 version?



Saturday, March 27, 2021

Easter Bunny Cookie Lollipops and Truffle Lollipops




If you're looking for a fun food craft, here it is. Making homemade bunny lollipops. If you're interested in how I did it, check out the short video below.

And Hoppy Easter!


Thursday, March 25, 2021

Flosstube Episode with Hoppy Easter Shirt made with Waste Canvas

Hoppy Easter Bunny Shirt

I wanted to make something to wear for the Easter holiday. So I decided to cross-stitch a t-shirt. And, I talked my sister into making one too. 

It's a super simple pattern I sketched out on graph paper and then went to work stitching it up. I used waste canvas to get my counted cross-stitch pattern on the shirt. First, I whip-stitched the canvas onto the t-shirt... and, well, if you want to see how I did it, simply click on the link below or visit my YouTube channel at KimKasch

And let me know if you think this bunny looks like a Peep. Plus, if you watch my short video, let me know  if you think I chose the right color for the bunny - from the choices I had. 


Wednesday, March 24, 2021

5 of the Best Literary Agents that Represent Children’s Books


 1)  Stephen Barbara

Agency: Inkwell Management – Top book genre: Children’s Books: Young Adult Fiction

Stephen is always drawn to compelling stories that marry quality writing to bold, imaginative concepts.

Email: submissions [at] inkwellmanagement [dot] com

2)  Daniel Lazar

Agency: Writers House – Top book genre: Children’s Books: Middle Grade Fiction

Daniel is on the lookout for distinct fiction and great, lively non-fiction. He represents adult and children's books and focuses mainly on middle grade and YA. He loves stories that introduce him to new worlds -- or recreate ones he may already know. He especially loves historical fiction. For non-fiction, he enjoys history, memoirs, narrative non-fiction, all stripes and studies of pop-culture, and gifty books that make him smile. He’s a huge fan of graphic novels and memoirs, and is excited to hear from cartoonists of all backgrounds; illustrated or photography books are a specialty. He’s intrigued by any book with unique views on parenting and family life.

Email: dlazar [at]  WritersHouse [dot] com

3)  Holly McGhee

Agency: Pippin Properties – Top book genre: Children’s Books: Picture book

Holly McGhee only accepts exclusive queries and requires four weeks to consider.

Holly is dedicated to shepherding books that make a difference into the world.

Please check her website but email: ExclusivetoHolly [at]  pippinproperties [dot]  com

4) Kristin Nelson

Agency:  Nelson Literary Agency – Top book genre: Children’s Books: Young Adult Fiction

Kristin is currently closed to submissions but check her website often to see if things change.

Her #MSWL includes:

Young adult novels that pack a serious or a delightful emotional punch delivered in a contemporary setting, #ownvoices, or in a past, future, or imagined world.

Middle grade novels full of heart, magical worlds, girl power, boy adventure, #ownvoices, brains over brawn.

5) Laura Rennert

Agency:  Andrea Brown Literary Agency – Top book genre: Children’s Books: Young Adult Fiction

Laura gravitates toward gorgeously written, weirdly idiosyncratic, and refreshingly unexpected. The common threads in the projects Laura represents are conflicted, dynamic characters; a fresh, strong voice; an unusual point of view; and vivid world-building. She loves reimagined literary traditions that are captivatingly new. She loves books that play with commercial tropes, with surprising emotional depth.

Email: ljrennert [at]  mac [dot] com