Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Roasted Pumpkin...Seeds

See the photo of the pumpkin seeds down in the right hand corner...? Whenever I carve pumpkins, I save the seeds. Then I separate out the gunk and rinse them in a strainer. After that, I put the seeds on a paper towel on a cookie sheet and I let them dry off a bit. Then I pull out the paper towel, spray the seeds with olive oil and sprinkle a little kosher salt over the top. I roast them on 350 degrees for about 20-30 minutes, (it depends on how big the seeds are, how many seeds there are, and how long I can wait!) I like my seeds a golden brown.

Pumpkin seeds are loaded with numerous health benefiting minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants.

In fact, some say they can even help prevent cancer. If you want to read 10 health benefits of pumpkin seeds just pop over here and check it out.

Now, I admit that when I was growing up, in a house with nine kids and grandma living with us, Mom used whatever she could to fill our stomachs. Nothing went into the garbage and Mom was sustainable before anyone else even used that word. But...pumpkin seeds are delicious.

I thought everyone ate them. But...my son was talking to a friend and that friend had never had pumpkin seeds so I thought . . . "What?!" I have to share my Mom's legacy to me, my kids and now you.

So, all you readers out there, do you roast pumpkin seeds? Do you do anything differently...maybe add some spices or sugar or ...?

1 comment:

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